Transmission

Alzheimer’s Disease A Transmissible Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). Prion disease is unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from the victim. All tissue is infectious.

prion disease

Prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices, restaurants and many other places infinitely. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Victims often become infectious long before they appear sick.

Alzheimer's disease contagion

Prions kill everything in their path—man or beast. Prions are highly infectious and the bodies of victims become highly infectious long before they look or feel sick. Blood, milk, meat, urine, saliva, mucas, feces and other bodily fluids of victims are contagious.

According to research from Duke University, caregivers of someone with dementia are six times more likely to develop the condition themselves.

It’s time to underscore the risks that caregivers must manage when caring for clients, friends and loved ones with dementia. In addition to protecting themselves, caregivers can minimize the chances of infecting others with deadly prions.

Alzheimer's disease diagnosis

Even sophisticated healthcare systems have failed to grasp the severity of prion disease. Unfortunately, hospitals around the world have been sued for spreading CJD to innocent patients.

Most health care systems are still misinformed and under-informed about the dangers that CJD patients pose to others. Therefore, these care facilities are exposing others and contributing to disease mismanagement.

Before you dismiss the prion threat as science fiction, call your local coroner. Most coroners refuse to touch the body of someone who likely died of CJD. They should be cautious with anyone who had any form of dementia upon death. All dementia patients and their bodies demand special handling and burial to avoid infecting others.

For more information, please visit http://alzheimerdisease.tv/

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